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My Hybrid Battery Died, What Should I Do? 

My Hybrid Battery Died, What Should I Do? 

It seems like people are getting less and less interested in Hybrid vehicles as their sales continue to fall in recent years across the United States. There is still a good number of hybrid trucks, cars, and SUVs running in the U.S, but what happens if your hybrid battery died?

Auto Repairs Are EXPENSIVE


Hybrid battery problems were not reported frequently by hybrid owners since they are designed to last for at least ten years. 

While this is true, several complaints reported about dead hybrid batteries caused several owners to wonder whether they should repair these batteries.

There are numerous steps you could take once you deal with a dead hybrid battery. This article highlights these steps, along with other best practices, in detail.

Check your hybrid's battery warranty

 

The first step you need to do when your hybrid battery dies is to check your manufacturer's warranty. 

Usually, hybrid batteries come with 100,000 miles or eight to ten years of the extended warranty, depending on the manufacturer and the vehicle's type.

Toyota and Lexus are nowadays going above and beyond when it comes to extended hybrid battery warranty. They provide each customer with 150,000 miles or ten years of battery warranty.

Therefore, if you haven't passed the extended warranty window, you shouldn't worry or panic as you can consult your automaker's company and have your battery changed free of charge. 

Check if your hybrid battery is repairable

 

On the other hand, if you've already passed the warranty window, the story is different, and you have to take a second route.

Your second order of business is to check the severity of the battery problem and whether it is repairable or not. 

First, look for a professional mechanic who has advanced experience in hybrid batteries and have him inspect your dead battery. This mechanic will be able to provide you with clear and accurate information about whether your vehicle is repairable and can hold a charge or not.

It's very crucial to understand the honest status of your vehicle. You don't want to live with temporary solutions where your battery will continue giving you hassle and stress every day.

While many dead hybrid batteries might not be repairable, remember that repairing a battery is way less expensive than installing a brand-new one. Thus, it is worth the time and research to check whether your battery is repairable or not.

How about replacing your dead battery? How much does it cost?

If you are familiar with regular car batteries, you will know that they don't cost more than $200 to be replaced. However, replacing a hybrid battery is significantly more expensive, and it costs somewhere between $3,000 and $8,000, depending on your car's make, model, and year.

Yes, it's shocking.

If you decided that your final option is to replace the hybrid battery, you need to be patient and wise about shopping for quotes. 

Unfortunately, once one deals with a dead hybrid battery, he will be looking for the fastest solution to get the vehicle running again. However, you need to shop for several quotes and get the best deal. 

A good piece of advice is to consider used hybrid batteries to save on replacement costs. However, you need to be very careful about the location where you purchase this battery, so you don't have to worry about dead batteries problems soon.

Is it worth replacing a dead hybrid car battery?

We are talking about $8,000 for replacing certain hybrid car batteries. The amount is insanely high; is it worth it?

Before making a final decision, you need to evaluate the overall condition of your vehicle and ask yourself other questions:

  • Does the hybrid vehicle have other significant problems that also require a lot of repair costs?
  • Is there a lot of mileage on the vehicle, which means there is a decent chance that other components will soon be damaged?
  • Are repair costs getting closer to 70% or more of the vehicle's value?

If your answer to any of the mentioned questions is a “yes,” you'd better not invest a penny in his vehicle because it is not worth it. 

Consider the timeframe of your vehicle ownership

Recent studies showed that car owners tend to keep their vehicles for longer periods than they need. For example, a recent study showed that the average ownership period for vehicles is about 11.6 years. 

When it comes to your hybrid car, do you think you are planning to keep it for that long period? Are there any plans to upgrade to a better, more modern vehicle in the next five or ten years? 

If you are happy with your hybrid vehicle and would like to keep it for its entire lifetime, it might be worth replacing the battery with a brand-new one that could serve you for this long time. 

On the other hand, if you are already shopping for a better vehicle and expecting to reach your saving goal in the next couple of years, it might not be worth investing in a brand-new battery, and it might be OK to even go with a used one.

Did you think of selling your hybrid vehicle?

If you plan to purchase a new car and already have something in mind, why don't you take advantage and sell your old hybrid?

By selling the old hybrid, you can use the payment as a down payment for your new vehicle to reduce your future monthly payments. 

You have many options to sell your old hybrid, even if it has a dead battery issue. 

For example, you can try classified websites like eBay Motors or Craigslist, where you create ads and have people find you through their platforms.

You can also try current social media platforms like Facebook Marketplace, Instagram, or TikTok to find the right private buyer for your car.

Keep in mind that private buyers are most likely looking for an operable vehicle, and your chances of selling to a private buyer can be a little challenging.

What other options then?

If you were not successful in selling your car to a private buyer, you could try dealership trade-in options.

Many dealerships out there might be interested in your hybrid car, even if it has battery problems. You can check out their available new vehicles and trade in your old hybrid with your vehicle of dreams. 

Again, dealerships also have their disadvantages, and you will most likely pay much more for your brand-new vehicle when you trade in compared to other people who did not trade-in. These are viable options when after your hybrid battery died.

You always have This Option Available!

It sounds like all the mentioned options have lots of drawbacks, and you will have to suffer either way in the car selling process.

How about a hassle-free car selling process, even with your dead battery?

Yes! Did you know that we, as junk car buyers, purchase vehicles no matter their type or condition? 

Yes, our company sees value in every vehicle and is willing to purchase your car within one to three days.

All that it takes you is a quick call describing your hybrid car's type and additional information regarding its condition, other than the battery issue. For example, please let us know whether your vehicle has a title or not, whether it has other significant problems in other major components or not.

This is not to stop buying your car, and it's more to provide you with better and more accurate offers representing your car's actual worth.

Once you provide this information, we use the most advanced technology to provide you with an instant offer within seconds. 

If you decided to go with the offer, you could let the team know that you are happy with it or click “accept” of using our online platform. 

Right after accepting the offer, you will be connected with one of our car removal specialists in the area, who will come pick up your car in a couple of days and hand you the cash payment right on the spot.

The best thing about our company is that we provide you with FREE towing despite your living location around the U.S. 

Conclusion – My Hybrid Battery Died

There is nothing more frustrating than dealing with a dead battery, especially with hybrid vehicles.

Unfortunately, replacing a dead battery in hybrid cars can be very costly. One should evaluate the situation carefully before attempting to replace the battery, especially with a brand-new one.

If you wonder, “my hybrid battery died, what should I do?” you need to check the warranty window, repair costs, or consider selling your vehicle.

You can sell your car to a private buyer online through classified websites or social media platforms. You can also trade it into a dealership and get your new vehicle of dreams.

Your best final option is to sell your car to a junk car buyer who will remove your vehicle free of charge and provide you with a hassle-free car selling process.